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1. Principles

I. Group structure

Fresenius is a worldwide operating health care group with products and services for dialysis, the hospital and the medical care of patients at home. Further areas of activity are hospital operations as well as engineering and services for hospitals and other health care facilities. In addition to the activities of the parent company Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA, Bad Homburg v. d. Höhe, the operating activities were split into the following legally independent business segments (subgroups) in the fiscal year 2012:

  • Fresenius Medical Care
  • Fresenius Kabi
  • Fresenius Helios
  • Fresenius Vamed

Fresenius Medical Care is the world’s leading provider of dialysis products and dialysis care for the life-saving treatment of patients with chronic kidney failure. Fresenius Medical Care treats 257,916 patients in its 3,160 own dialysis clinics.

Fresenius Kabi is a globally active company, providing infusion therapies, intravenously administered generic drugs, clinical nutrition and the related medical devices. The products are used for the therapy and care of critically and chronically ill patients in and outside the hospital. In Europe, Fresenius Kabi is the market leader in infusion therapies and clinical nutrition, in the United States, the company is a leading provider of intravenously administered generic drugs.

Fresenius Helios is one of the largest private hospital operators in Germany.

Fresenius Vamed provides engineering and services for hospitals and other health care facilities internationally.

Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA owned 31.18% of the ordinary voting shares of Fresenius Medical Care AG & Co. KGaA (FMC-AG & Co. KGaA) and 30.77% of the total subscribed capital of FMC-AG & Co. KGaA at the end of the fiscal year 2012. Fresenius Medical Care Management AG, the general partner of FMC-AG & Co. KGaA, is a wholly owned subsidiary of Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA. Therefore, FMC-AG & Co. KGaA is fully consolidated in the consolidated financial statements of the Fresenius Group. Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA continued to hold 100% of the management companies of the business segments Fresenius Kabi (Fresenius Kabi AG) as well as Fresenius Helios and Fresenius Vamed (both held through Fresenius ProServe GmbH) on December 31, 2012. Through Fresenius ProServe GmbH, Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA holds 100% in HELIOS Kliniken GmbH and a 77% stake in VAMED AG. In addition, Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA holds interests in companies with holding functions regarding real estate, financing and insurance, as well as in Fresenius Netcare GmbH which offers services in the field of information technology and in Fresenius Biotech Beteiligungs GmbH.

The reporting currency in the Fresenius Group is the euro. In order to make the presentation clearer, amounts are mostly shown in million euros. Amounts under €1 million after rounding are marked with “–”.

II. Change of Fresenius se’s legal form into a partnership limited by shares (Kommanditgesellschaft auf Aktien) and conversion of the preference shares into ordinary shares

On May 12, 2010, Fresenius SE’s Annual General Meeting approved the change of Fresenius SE’s legal form into a partnership limited by shares (Kommanditgesellschaft auf Aktien, KGaA) with the name Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA in combination with the conversion of all non-voting preference shares into voting ordinary shares. The change of legal form as well as the conversion of shares was also approved by the preference shareholders through a special resolution.

Upon registration with the commercial register of the local court in Bad Homburg v. d. H., the change of legal form into Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA became effective on January 28, 2011. According to the resolution passed, the holders of preference shares received one ordinary share of Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA for each preference share held in Fresenius SE; the ordinary shareholders received one ordinary share of Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA for each ordinary share held in Fresenius SE. The notional proportion of each non-par value share in the subscribed capital as well as the subscribed capital itself remained unchanged.

III. Basis of presentation

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (U.S. GAAP).

Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA, as a stock exchange listed company with a domicile in a member state of the European Union, fulfills its obligation to prepare and publish the consolidated financial statements in accordance with the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) applying Section 315a of the German Commercial Code (HGB). Simultaneously, the Fresenius Group voluntarily prepares and publishes the consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP.

In order to improve readability, various items are aggregated in the consolidated statement of financial position and in the consolidated statement of income. These items are shown separately in the notes to provide useful information to the readers of the consolidated financial statements.

The consolidated statement of financial position is classified on the basis of the maturity of assets and liabilities; the consolidated statement of income is classified using the cost-of-sales accounting format.

IV. Summary of significant accounting policies

a) Principles of consolidation

The financial statements of consolidated entities have been prepared using uniform accounting methods.

Capital consolidation is performed by offsetting investments in subsidiaries against the underlying revaluated equity at the date of acquisition. The identifiable assets and liabilities of subsidiaries as well as the noncontrolling interest are recognized at their fair values. Any remaining debit balance between the investments in subsidiaries plus the noncontrolling interest and the revaluated equity is recognized as goodwill and is tested at least once a year for impairment.

Associated companies (over which Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA has significant exercisable influence, even when it holds 50% or less of the common stock of the company) are consolidated using the equity method. Investments that are not classified as in associated companies are recorded at acquisition costs or at fair value, respectively.

All significant intercompany sales, expenses, income, receivables and payables are eliminated. Profits and losses on items of property, plant and equipment and inventory acquired from other Group entities are also eliminated. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized on temporary differences resulting from consolidation procedures.

Noncontrolling interest subject to put provisions is recognized between liabilities and equity in the consolidated statement of financial position. Noncontrolling interest not subject to put provisions comprises the interest of noncontrolling shareholders in the consolidated equity of Group entities. Profits and losses attributable to the noncontrolling shareholders are separately disclosed in the consolidated statement of income. Noncontrolling interest not subject to put provisions of recently acquired entities is valuated at fair value.

b) Composition of the Group

The consolidated financial statements include all material companies in which Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA has legal or effective control. In addition, the Fresenius Group consolidates variable interest entities (VIEs) for which it is deemed the primary beneficiary.

Fresenius Medical Care has entered into various arrangements with certain dialysis clinics and a dialysis product distributor to provide management services, financing and product supply. The dialysis clinics and the dialysis product distributor have either negative equity or are unable to provide their own funding for their operations. Therefore, Fresenius Medical Care has agreed to fund their operations through loans.

The compensation for the funding can carry interest, exclusive product supply agreements or entitle Fresenius Medical Care to a prorata share of profits, if any. Fresenius Medical Care has a right of first refusal in the event the owners sell the business or assets. These clinics and the dialysis product distributor are VIEs, in which Fresenius Medical Care has been determined to be the primary beneficiary and which therefore have been fully consolidated. They generated approximately €151 million (US$194 million) and €140 million (US$195 million) in sales in 2012 and 2011, respectively. Fresenius Medical Care provided funding to these VIEs through loans and accounts receivable of €111 million (US$147 million) and €114 million (US$148 million) in 2012 and 2011, respectively. Relating to the VIEs, in 2012, Fresenius Medical Care consolidated assets in an amount of €152 million (US$200 million), liabilities in an amount of €102 million (US$134 million) and €50 million (US$66 million) in equity. In 2011, €168 million (US$217 million) assets, €125 million (US$162 million) liabilities and €43 million (US$55 million) equity were consolidated. The interest held by the other shareholders in the consolidated VIEs is reported as noncontrolling interest in the consolidated statement of financial position at December 31, 2012.

Fresenius Vamed participates in long-term project entities which are set up for long-term defined periods of time and for the specific purpose of constructing and operating thermal centers. Some of these project entities qualify as VIEs, in which Fresenius Vamed is not the primary beneficiary based on the cash flow analysis of the involved parties. The project entities generated approximately €86 million in sales in 2012 (2011: €78 million). The VIEs finance themselves mainly through debt, profit participation rights and investment grants. Assets and liabilities relating to the VIEs are not material. Fresenius Vamed made no payments to the VIEs other than contractually stipulated. From today’s perspective and due to the contractual situation, Fresenius Vamed is not exposed to any material risk of loss from these VIEs.

The consolidated financial statements of 2012 included, in addition to Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA, 221 (2011: 163) German and 1,481 (2011: 1,094) foreign companies.

The composition of the Group changed as follows:

  Germany Abroad Total
December 31, 2011 163 1,094 1,257
Additions 60 427 487
of which newly founded 17 82 99
of which acquired 42 334 376
Disposals 2 40 42
of which no longer consolidated 1 34 35
of which merged 1 6 7
December 31, 2012 221 1,481 1,702

  Germany Abroad Total
December 31, 2011 163 1,094 1,257
Additions 60 427 487
of which newly founded 17 82 99
of which acquired 42 334 376
Disposals 2 40 42
of which no longer consolidated 1 34 35
of which merged 1 6 7
December 31, 2012 221 1,481 1,702

29 companies (2011: 19) were accounted for under the equity method.

The complete list of the investments of Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA, registered office in Bad Homburg v. d. H., will be submitted to the electronic Federal Gazette and the electronic companies register.

In 2012, the following fully consolidated German subsidiaries of the Fresenius Group applied the exemption provided in Sections 264 (3) and 264b, respectively, of the German Commercial Code (HGB):

Name of the company Registered office
Corporate / Other
Fresenius Biotech GmbH Gräfelfing
Fresenius Biotech Beteiligungs GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Immobilien-Verwaltungs-GmbH & Co. Objekt Friedberg KG Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Immobilien-Verwaltungs-GmbH & Co.
Objekt St. Wendel KG
Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Immobilien-Verwaltungs-GmbH & Co.
Objekt Schweinfurt KG
Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Netcare GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius ProServe GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
FPS Beteiligungs AG Düsseldorf
FPS Immobilien Verwaltungs GmbH & Co. Reichenbach KG Bad Homburg v. d. H.
ProServe Krankenhaus Beteiligungsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG München
ProServe Zweite Krankenhaus
Beteiligungsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG
München
Fresenius Kabi
CFL GmbH Frankfurt am Main
Fresenius HemoCare GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius HemoCare Beteiligungs GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Kabi AG Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Kabi Deutschland GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Hosped GmbH Friedberg
MC Medizintechnik GmbH Alzenau
Rheinische Compounding GmbH Bonn
V. Krütten Medizinische Einmalgeräte GmbH Idstein
Fresenius Helios
Ahrenshoop Service GmbH Ahrenshoop
Akademie Damp GmbH Damp
Baltic Service GmbH Damp
Betriebsführungsgesellschaft
Schloß Schönhagen GmbH
Damp
Damp Diagnostik und
Physio Holding GmbH
Kiel
Damp Holding GmbH Damp
Damp Touristik GmbH Damp
Deutsches Zentrum für
Präventivmedizin GmbH
Damp
D.i.a.-Solution GmbH Erfurt
Gesundheitsmanagement Damp GmbH Hamburg
HELIOS Agnes Karll Krankenhaus GmbH Bochum
HELIOS Care GmbH Berlin
HELIOS Catering GmbH Berlin
HELIOS ENDO-Klinik Hamburg GmbH Hamburg
HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund GmbH Stralsund
HELIOS Kids in Pflege GmbH Geesthacht
HELIOS Klinik Ahrenshoop GmbH Ahrenshoop
HELIOS Klinik Dresden-Wachwitz GmbH Dresden
HELIOS Klinik Geesthacht GmbH Geesthacht
HELIOS Klinik Lehmrade GmbH Lehmrade
HELIOS Klinik Lengerich GmbH Lengerich
HELIOS Klinik Schloss Schönhagen GmbH Damp
HELIOS Kliniken GmbH Berlin
HELIOS Kliniken
Breisgau-Hochschwarzwald GmbH
Müllheim
HELIOS Kliniken Leipziger Land GmbH Borna
HELIOS Kliniken Mansfeld-Südharz GmbH Sangerhausen
HELIOS Klinikum Aue GmbH Aue
HELIOS Klinikum Bad Saarow GmbH Bad Saarow
HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt GmbH Erfurt
HELIOS Klinikum Schwelm GmbH Schwelm
HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal GmbH Wuppertal
HELIOS Ostseeklinik Damp GmbH Damp
HELIOS Privatkliniken GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
HELIOS Rehaklinik Damp GmbH Damp
HELIOS Service GmbH Berlin
HELIOS Versorgungszentren GmbH Berlin
HELIOS Versorgungszentrum
Bad Saarow GmbH
Bad Saarow
HELIOS Vogtland-Klinikum Plauen GmbH Plauen
HUMAINE Kliniken GmbH Berlin
Poliklinik am HELIOS Klinikum
Buch GmbH
Berlin
Senioren- und Pflegeheim Erfurt GmbH Erfurt
St. Josefs-Hospital GmbH Bochum
Therapie Centrum Damp GmbH Damp
Verwaltungsgesellschaft
ENDO-Klinik mbH
Hamburg
Zentrale Service-Gesellschaft Damp mbH Damp

Name of the company Registered office
Corporate / Other
Fresenius Biotech GmbH Gräfelfing
Fresenius Biotech Beteiligungs GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Immobilien-Verwaltungs-GmbH & Co. Objekt Friedberg KG Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Immobilien-Verwaltungs-GmbH & Co.
Objekt St. Wendel KG
Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Immobilien-Verwaltungs-GmbH & Co.
Objekt Schweinfurt KG
Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Netcare GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius ProServe GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
FPS Beteiligungs AG Düsseldorf
FPS Immobilien Verwaltungs GmbH & Co. Reichenbach KG Bad Homburg v. d. H.
ProServe Krankenhaus Beteiligungsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG München
ProServe Zweite Krankenhaus
Beteiligungsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG
München
Fresenius Kabi
CFL GmbH Frankfurt am Main
Fresenius HemoCare GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius HemoCare Beteiligungs GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Kabi AG Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Fresenius Kabi Deutschland GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
Hosped GmbH Friedberg
MC Medizintechnik GmbH Alzenau
Rheinische Compounding GmbH Bonn
V. Krütten Medizinische Einmalgeräte GmbH Idstein
Fresenius Helios
Ahrenshoop Service GmbH Ahrenshoop
Akademie Damp GmbH Damp
Baltic Service GmbH Damp
Betriebsführungsgesellschaft
Schloß Schönhagen GmbH
Damp
Damp Diagnostik und
Physio Holding GmbH
Kiel
Damp Holding GmbH Damp
Damp Touristik GmbH Damp
Deutsches Zentrum für
Präventivmedizin GmbH
Damp
D.i.a.-Solution GmbH Erfurt
Gesundheitsmanagement Damp GmbH Hamburg
HELIOS Agnes Karll Krankenhaus GmbH Bochum
HELIOS Care GmbH Berlin
HELIOS Catering GmbH Berlin
HELIOS ENDO-Klinik Hamburg GmbH Hamburg
HELIOS Hanseklinikum Stralsund GmbH Stralsund
HELIOS Kids in Pflege GmbH Geesthacht
HELIOS Klinik Ahrenshoop GmbH Ahrenshoop
HELIOS Klinik Dresden-Wachwitz GmbH Dresden
HELIOS Klinik Geesthacht GmbH Geesthacht
HELIOS Klinik Lehmrade GmbH Lehmrade
HELIOS Klinik Lengerich GmbH Lengerich
HELIOS Klinik Schloss Schönhagen GmbH Damp
HELIOS Kliniken GmbH Berlin
HELIOS Kliniken
Breisgau-Hochschwarzwald GmbH
Müllheim
HELIOS Kliniken Leipziger Land GmbH Borna
HELIOS Kliniken Mansfeld-Südharz GmbH Sangerhausen
HELIOS Klinikum Aue GmbH Aue
HELIOS Klinikum Bad Saarow GmbH Bad Saarow
HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt GmbH Erfurt
HELIOS Klinikum Schwelm GmbH Schwelm
HELIOS Klinikum Wuppertal GmbH Wuppertal
HELIOS Ostseeklinik Damp GmbH Damp
HELIOS Privatkliniken GmbH Bad Homburg v. d. H.
HELIOS Rehaklinik Damp GmbH Damp
HELIOS Service GmbH Berlin
HELIOS Versorgungszentren GmbH Berlin
HELIOS Versorgungszentrum
Bad Saarow GmbH
Bad Saarow
HELIOS Vogtland-Klinikum Plauen GmbH Plauen
HUMAINE Kliniken GmbH Berlin
Poliklinik am HELIOS Klinikum
Buch GmbH
Berlin
Senioren- und Pflegeheim Erfurt GmbH Erfurt
St. Josefs-Hospital GmbH Bochum
Therapie Centrum Damp GmbH Damp
Verwaltungsgesellschaft
ENDO-Klinik mbH
Hamburg
Zentrale Service-Gesellschaft Damp mbH Damp

c) Classifications

Certain items in the consolidated financial statements of 2011 have been reclassified to conform with the presentation in 2012.

In the business segment Fresenius Medical Care, sales have been restated to reflect the adoption of Accounting Standards Update 2011-07. Specifically, bad debt expense in the amount of US$225 million (€161 million) was reclassified from selling, general and administrative expenses as a reduction of sales for 2011. In addition, in the business segment Fresenius Medical Care, freight expense in the amount of US$144 million (€104 million) was reclassified from selling, general and administrative expenses to cost of sales to harmonize the presentation for all business segments for 2011.

d) Sales recognition policy

Sales from services are recognized at the amount estimated to be received under reimbursement arrangements with third party payors. Sales are recognized on the date services and related products are provided and the customer is obligated to pay.

Product sales are recognized when the title to the product passes to the customers, either at the time of shipment, upon receipt by the customer or upon any other terms that clearly define passage of title. As product returns are not typical, no return allowances are established. In the event that a return is required, the appropriate reductions to sales, cost of sales and accounts receivable are made. Sales are presented net of discounts, allowances and rebates.

In the business segment Fresenius Vamed, sales for long-term production contracts are recognized using the percentage of completion (PoC) method when the accounting conditions are met. The sales to be recognized are calculated as a percentage of the costs already incurred based on the estimated total cost of the contract, milestones laid down in the contract or the percentage of completion. Profits are only recognized when the outcome of a production contract accounted for using the PoC method can be measured reliably.

Any tax assessed by a governmental authority that is incurred as a result of a sales transaction (e. g. sales tax) is excluded from sales and the related sale is reported on a net basis.

e) Government grants

Public sector grants are not recognized until there is reasonable assurance that the respective conditions are met and the grants will be received. Initially, the grant is recorded as a liability and as soon as the asset is acquired, the grant is offset against the acquisition costs. Expense-related grants are recognized as income in the periods in which related costs occur.

f) Research and development expenses

Research is original and planned investigation undertaken with the prospect of gaining new scientific or technical knowledge and understanding. Development is the technical and commercial implementation of research findings. Research and development expenses are expensed as incurred.

g) Impairment

The Fresenius Group reviews the carrying amounts of its property, plant and equipment, intangible assets and other non-current assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of these assets may not be recoverable. Recoverability of these assets is measured by comparing the carrying amount of an asset to the future net cash flow directly associated with the asset. If assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment recognized is the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the fair value of the asset. The Fresenius Group uses a discounted cash flow approach or other methods, if appropriate, to assess fair value. Long-lived assets to be disposed of by sale are reported at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less cost to sell and depreciation is ceased.

h) Capitalized interest

The Fresenius Group includes capitalized interest as part of the cost of the asset if it is directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or manufacture of qualifying assets. For the fiscal years 2012 and 2011, interest of €3 million and €4 million, respectively, based on an average interest rate of 4.53% and 4.12%, respectively, was recognized as a component of the cost of assets.

i) Income taxes

Current taxes are calculated based on the earnings of the fiscal year and in accordance with local tax rules of the respective tax jurisdiction. Expected and executed additional tax payments and tax refunds for prior years are also taken into account.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future consequences attributable to temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax basis. Furthermore, deferred taxes are recognized on consolidation procedures affecting net income attributable to shareholders of Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA. Deferred tax assets also include claims to future tax reductions which arise from the more likely than not expected usage of existing tax losses available for carryforward. The recognition of deferred tax assets from net operating losses and their utilization is based on the budget planning of the Fresenius Group and implemented tax strategies.

Deferred taxes are computed using enacted or adopted tax rates in the relevant national jurisdictions when the amounts are recovered. Tax rates which will be valid in the future but are not adopted till the date of the statement of financial position are not considered.

The realizability of the carrying amount of a deferred tax asset is reviewed at each date of the statement of financial position. In assessing the realizability of deferred taxes, the Management considers whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of a deferred tax asset will be realized or whether deferred tax liabilities will be reversed. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income during the periods in which those temporary differences become deductible. The Management considers the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities and projected future taxable income in making this assessment.

If it is no longer more likely than not that sufficient taxable income will be available to allow the benefit of part or of the entire deferred tax asset to be utilized, the carrying amount of the deferred tax asset is reduced to that certain extent. The reduction is reversed to the date and extent that it becomes probable that sufficient taxable profit will be available.

j) Unrecognized tax benefits

The recognition and measurement of all tax positions taken or expected to be taken on a tax return requires a two step approach. The Fresenius Group must determine whether it is more likely than not that a tax position will be sustained upon examination, including resolution of any related appeals or litigation processes, based on the technical merits of the position. If the threshold is met, the tax position is measured at the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement and is recognized in the consolidated financial statements.

k) Earnings per ordinary share

Basic earnings per ordinary share are computed by dividing net income attributable to shareholders of Fresenius SE & Co. KGaA by the weighted-average number of ordinary shares outstanding during the year. Diluted earnings per share include the effect of all potentially dilutive instruments on ordinary shares that would have been outstanding during the fiscal year. The equity-settled awards granted under Fresenius’ and Fresenius Medical Care’s stock option plans can result in a dilutive effect.

l) Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash funds and all short-term, liquid investments with original maturities of up to three months (time deposits and securities).

m) Trade accounts receivable

Trade accounts receivable are stated at their nominal value less an allowance for doubtful accounts. The allowances are estimates comprised of customer specific evaluations regarding their payment history, current financial stability, and applicable country-specific risks for receivables that are overdue more than one year. From time to time, accounts receivable are reviewed for changes from the historic collection experience to ensure the appropriateness of the allowances.

n) Inventories

Inventories comprise all assets which are held for sale in the normal course of business (finished goods), in the process of production for such sale (work in process) or consumed in the production process or in the rendering of services (raw materials and purchased components).

Inventories are stated at the lower of acquisition and manufacturing cost (determined by using the average or first-in, first-out method) or market value. Manufacturing costs comprise direct costs, production and material overhead, including depreciation charges.

o) Available for sale financial assets

Investments in equity instruments, debt instruments and fund shares are classified as available for sale financial assets and measured at fair value provided that this fair value can be determined reliably. Equity instruments that do not have a quoted price in an active market and a reliably measurable fair value, are recognized at acquisition cost. The Fresenius Group regularly reviews if objective substantial evidence occurs that would indicate an impairment of a financial asset or a portfolio of financial assets. After testing the recoverability of these assets, a possible impairment loss is recorded in the consolidated statement of financial position. Gains and losses of available for sale financial assets are recognized directly in the consolidated statement of equity until the financial asset is disposed of or if it is considered to be impaired. In the case of an impairment, the accumulated net loss is retrieved from the consolidated statement of equity and recognized in the consolidated statement of income.

p) Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are stated at acquisition and manufacturing cost less accumulated depreciation. Significant improvements are capitalized; repairs and maintenance costs that do not extend the useful lives of the assets are charged to expense as incurred. Depreciation on property, plant and equipment is calculated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets ranging from 3 to 50 years for buildings and improvements (with a weighted-average life of 16 years) and 2 to 15 years for machinery and equipment (with a weighted-average life of 11 years).

q) Intangible assets with finite useful lives

Intangible assets with finite useful lives, such as patents, product and distribution rights, non-compete agreements, technology as well as licenses to manufacture, distribute and sell pharmaceutical drugs, are amortized using the straight-line method over their respective useful lives to their residual values and reviewed for impairment (see note 1. g, Impairment). The useful life of patents, product and distribution rights ranges from 5 to 20 years, the average useful life is 13 years. Non-compete agreements with finite useful lives have useful lives ranging from 2 to 25 years with an average useful life of 8 years. The useful life of management contracts with finite useful lives ranges from 5 to 40 years. Technology has a finite useful live of 15 years. Licenses to manufacture, distribute and sell pharmaceutical drugs are amortized over the contractual license period based upon the annual estimated units of sale of the licensed product. All other intangible assets are amortized over their individual estimated useful lives between 3 and 15 years.

Losses in value of a lasting nature are recorded as an impairment.

r) Goodwill and other intangible assets with indefinite useful lives

The Fresenius Group identified intangible assets with indefinite useful lives because, based on an analysis of all of the relevant factors, there is no foreseeable limit to the period over which those assets are expected to generate net cash inflows for the Group. The identified intangible assets with indefinite useful lives such as trade names and certain qualified management contracts acquired in a purchase method business combination are recognized and reported apart from goodwill. They are recorded at acquisition costs. Goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite useful lives are not amortized but tested for impairment annually or when an event becomes known that could trigger an impairment (impairment test).

To perform the annual impairment test of goodwill, the Fresenius Group identified several reporting units and determined their carrying amount by assigning the assets and liabilities, including the existing goodwill and intangible assets, to those reporting units. A reporting unit is usually defined one level below the segment level based on regions or legal entities. Four reporting units were identified in the segment Fresenius Medical Care (Europe, Latin America, Asia-Pacific and North America). In the segment Fresenius Kabi, there is one reporting unit for the region North America and one reporting unit for the business outside of North America. According to the regional organizational structure, the segment Fresenius Helios consists of seven reporting units, which are managed by a central division. The segment Fresenius Vamed consists of two reporting units (Project business and Service business). At least once a year, the Fresenius Group compares the fair value of each reporting unit to the reporting unit’s carrying amount. The fair value of a reporting unit is determined using a discounted cash flow approach based upon the cash flow expected to be generated by the reporting unit. In case that the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, the difference is at first recorded as an impairment of the fair value of the goodwill.

To evaluate the recoverability of separable intangible assets with indefinite useful lives, the Fresenius Group compares the fair values of these intangible assets with their carrying amounts. An intangible asset’s fair value is determined using a discounted cash flow approach and other methods, if appropriate.

The recoverability of goodwill and other separable intangible assets with indefinite useful lives recorded in the Group’s consolidated statement of financial position was verified. As a result, the Fresenius Group did not record any impairment losses in 2012 and 2011.

Any excess of the net fair value of identifiable assets and liabilities over cost (badwill) still existing after reassessing the purchase price allocation is recognized immediately in profit or loss.

s) Leases

Leased assets assigned to the Fresenius Group based on the risk and rewards approach (finance leases) are recognized as property, plant and equipment and measured on receipt date at the present values of lease payments as long as their fair values are not lower. Leased assets are depreciated in straight-line over their useful lives. If there is doubt as to whether title to the asset passes at a later stage and there is no opportune purchase option, the asset is depreciated over the lease term if this is shorter. An impairment loss is recognized if the recoverable amount is lower than the amortized cost of the leased asset.

Finance lease liabilities are measured at the present value of the future lease payments and are recognized as a financial liability.

Property, plant and equipment that is rented by the Fresenius Group is accounted for at its purchase cost. Depreciation is calculated using the straight-line method over the leasing time and its expected residual value.

t) Financial instruments

A financial instrument is any contract that gives rise to a financial asset of one entity and a financial liability or equity instrument of another entity. The following categories (according to International Accounting Standard 39, Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement) are relevant for the Fresenius Group: loans and receivables, financial liabilities measured at amortized cost, available for sale financial assets as well as financial liabilities / assets measured at fair value in the consolidated statement of income. Other categories are immaterial or not existing in the Fresenius Group. According to their character, the Fresenius Group classifies its financial instruments into the following classes: cash and cash equivalents, assets recognized at carrying amount, liabilities recognized at carrying amount, derivatives for hedging purposes as well as assets recognized at fair value, liabilities recognized at fair value and noncontrolling interest subject to put provisions recognized at fair value.

The relationship between classes and categories as well as the reconciliation to the consolidated statement of financial position is shown in tabular form in note 31, Financial instruments.

The Fresenius Group has potential obligations to purchase the noncontrolling interests held by third parties in certain of its consolidated subsidiaries. These obligations are in the form of put provisions and are exercisable at the third-party owners’ discretion within specified periods as outlined in each specific put provision. If these put provisions were exercised, the Fresenius Group would be required to purchase all or part of the third-party owners’ noncontrolling interests at the appraised fair value at the time of exercise. To estimate the fair values of the noncontrolling interest subject to put provisions, the Fresenius Group recognizes the higher of net book value or a multiple of earnings, based on historical earnings, the development stage of the underlying business and other factors. Depending on the market conditions, the estimated fair values of the noncontrolling interest subject to these put provisions can also fluctuate and the implicit multiple of earnings at which the noncontrolling interest subject to put provisions may ultimately be settled could vary significantly from Fresenius Group’s current estimates.

Derivative financial instruments, which primarily include foreign currency forward contracts and interest rate swaps, are recognized at fair value as assets or liabilities in the consolidated statement of financial position. Changes in the fair value of derivative financial instruments classified as fair value hedges and in the corresponding underlyings are recognized periodically in earnings. The effective portion of changes in fair value of cash flow hedges is recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in shareholders’ equity until the secured underlying transaction is realized (see note 31, Financial instruments). The ineffective portion of cash flow hedges is recognized in current earnings. Changes in the fair value of derivatives that are not designated as hedging instruments are recognized periodically in earnings.

u) Liabilities

Liabilities are generally stated at present value, which normally corresponds to the value of products or services which are delivered. As a general policy, short-term liabilities are measured at their repayment amount.

v) Legal contingencies

In the ordinary course of Fresenius Group’s operations, the Fresenius Group is involved in litigation, arbitration, administrative procedure and investigations relating to various aspects of its business. The Fresenius Group regularly analyzes current information about such claims for probable losses and provides accruals for such matters, including estimated expenses for legal services, as appropriate. The Fresenius Group utilizes its internal legal department as well as external resources for these assessments. In making the decision regarding the need for a loss accrual, the Fresenius Group considers the degree of probability of an unfavorable outcome and its ability to make a reasonable estimate of the amount of loss.

The filing of a suit or formal assertion of a claim, or the disclosure of any such suit or assertion, does not necessarily indicate that an accrual of a loss is appropriate.

w) Accrued expenses

Accruals for taxes and other obligations are recognized when there is a present obligation to a third party arising from past events, it is probable that the obligation will be settled in the future and the amount can be reliably estimated.

Tax accruals include obligations for the current year and for prior years.

x) Pension liabilities and similar obligations

The Fresenius Group recognizes the underfunded status of its defined benefit plans, measured as the difference between the benefit obligation and plan assets at fair value, as a liability. Changes in the funded status of a plan, net of tax, resulting from unrecognized actuarial gains or losses, unrecognized prior service costs or costs that are not recognized as components of the net periodic benefit cost, will be recognized through accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in the year in which they occur. Actuarial gains or losses and prior service costs are subsequently recognized as components of net periodic benefit cost when realized.

y) Debt issuance costs

Debt issuance costs are capitalized separately from the underlying debt and are amortized over the term of the related obligation.

z) Stock option plans

In line with the standard for share-based payment, the Fresenius Group uses the modified prospective transition method. Under this transition method, in 2011 and 2012, the Fresenius Group recognized compensation cost for all stock-based payments subsequent to January 1, 2007 (based on the grant-date fair value estimated).

 

aa) Self-insurance programs

Under the insurance programs for professional, product and general liability, auto liability and worker’s compensation claims, the largest subsidiary of Fresenius Medical Care AG & Co. KGaA (FMC-AG & Co. KGaA), located in North America, is partially self-insured for professional liability claims. For all other coverages, FMC-AG & Co. KGaA assumes responsibility for incurred claims up to predetermined amounts, above which third party insurance applies. Reported liabilities for the year represent estimated future payments of the anticipated expense for claims incurred (both reported and incurred but not reported) based on historical experience and existing claim activity. This experience includes both the rate of claims incidence (number) and claim severity (cost) and is combined with individual claim expectations to estimate the reported amounts.

bb) Foreign currency translation

The reporting currency is the euro. Substantially all assets and liabilities of the foreign subsidiaries are translated at the mid-closing rate on the date of the statement of financial position, while income and expense are translated at average exchange rates. Adjustments due to foreign currency translation fluctuations are excluded from net earnings and are reported in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss). In addition, the translation adjustments of certain intercompany borrowings, which are considered foreign equity investments, are also reported in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss).

Gains and losses arising from the translation of foreign currency positions as well as those arising from the elimination of foreign currency intercompany loans are recorded as general and administrative expenses, as far as they are not considered foreign equity instruments. In the fiscal year 2012, only immaterial losses resulted out of this transaction.

The exchange rates of the main currencies affecting foreign currency translation developed as follows:

  Stichtagskurs1 Durchschnittskurs
1 Mittelkurs am Bilanzstichtag  
  31. Dez. 2012 31. Dez. 2011 2012 2011
US-Dollar je € 1,3194 1,2939 1,2848 1,3920
Pfund Sterling je € 0,8161 0,8353 0,8109 0,8679
Schwedische Kronen je € 8,5820 8,9120 8,7041 9,0298
Chinesische Renminbi Yuan je € 8,2207 8,1588 8,1052 8,9960
Japanische Yen je € 113,61 100,20 102,49 110,96

  Stichtagskurs1 Durchschnittskurs
1 Mittelkurs am Bilanzstichtag  
  31. Dez. 2012 31. Dez. 2011 2012 2011
US-Dollar je € 1,3194 1,2939 1,2848 1,3920
Pfund Sterling je € 0,8161 0,8353 0,8109 0,8679
Schwedische Kronen je € 8,5820 8,9120 8,7041 9,0298
Chinesische Renminbi Yuan je € 8,2207 8,1588 8,1052 8,9960
Japanische Yen je € 113,61 100,20 102,49 110,96

cc) Fair value hierarchy

The three-tier fair value hierarchy as defined in Financial Accounting Standards Boards Accounting Standards Codification Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, classifies assets and liabilities recognized at fair value based on the inputs used in estimating the fair value. Level 1 is defined as observable inputs, such as quoted prices in active markets. Level 2 is defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are directly or indirectly observable. Level 3 is defined as unobservable inputs for which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring the company to develop its own assumptions. The three-tier fair value hierarchy is used in note 26, Pensions and similar obligations, and in note 31, Financial instruments.

dd) Use of estimates

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of income and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

ee) Receivables management

The entities of the Fresenius Group perform ongoing evaluations of the financial situation of their customers and generally do not require a collateral from the customers for the supply of products and provision of services. Approximately 18% and 17% of Fresenius Group’s sales were earned and subject to the regulations under governmental health care programs, Medicare and Medicaid, administered by the United States government in 2012 and 2011, respectively.

ff) Recent pronouncements, applied

The Fresenius Group has prepared its consolidated financial statements at December 31, 2012 in conformity with U.S. GAAP that have to be applied for fiscal years beginning on January 1, 2012 or U.S. GAAP that can be applied earlier on a voluntary basis.

The Fresenius Group applied the following standards, as far as they are relevant for Fresenius Group’s business, for the first time in 2012:

In July 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update 2011-07 (ASU 2011-07), FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 954, Health Care Entities – Presentation and Disclosure of Patient Service Revenue, Provision for Bad Debts and the Allowance for Doubtful Accounts for Certain Health Care Entities, in order to provide financial statement users with greater transparency about a health care entity’s net patient service revenue and the related allowance for doubtful accounts. The standard requires health care entities that recognize significant amounts of patient service revenue at the time the services are rendered even though they do not assess the patient’s ability to pay to present the provision for bad debts related to patient service revenue as a deduction from patient service revenue (net of contractual allowances and discounts) on their statement of operations. The provision for bad debts which the Fresenius Group presented as an operating expense before 2012 has been reclassified to a deduction from patient service revenue. The amendments to the presentation of the provision for bad debts related to patient service revenue in the statement of operations have been applied retrospectively to all prior periods presented. The Fresenius Group adopted the provisions of ASU 2011-07 as of January 1, 2012 and has restated the financial results of 2011 accordingly.

In June 2011, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update 2011-05 (ASU 2011-05), FASB ASC Topic 220, Comprehensive Income – Presentation of Comprehensive Income. In December 2011, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update 2011-12 (ASU 2011-12), FASB ASC Topic 220, Comprehensive Income – Deferral of the Effective Date for Amendments to the Presentation of Reclassifications of Items out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income in Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-05. The FASB additionally issued Accounting Standards Update 2013-02 (ASU 2013-02), FASB ASC Topic 220, Comprehensive Income – Reporting of Amounts Reclassified out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income, in February 2013, which is effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2012. The requirements established in ASU 2011-05 oblige that all components of other comprehensive income (OCI) be presented either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but continuous statements. ASU 2013-02 will require the adjustments to the components of accumulated OCI and their related tax effects to be presented on the face of the statement in which the components of OCI are presented or in the notes to the financial statements remains for year-end disclosure. The Fresenius Group presents two separate but continuous statements of net income and comprehensive income and as such the Fresenius Group is in compliance with presentation of FASB ASC Topic 220, Comprehensive Income – Presentation of Comprehensive Income and Presentation of Items Reclassified out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income. Additionally, the Fresenius Group has early adopted ASU 2013-02 for the adjustments to the components and their tax effects.

In May 2011, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update 2011-04 (ASU 2011-04), FASB ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurement – Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs. The amendments in ASU 2011-04 result in common fair value measurement and disclosure requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRSs. These amendments include clarifications of the application of highest and best use and valuation premise concepts, the measurement of the fair value of an instrument classified in a reporting entity’s shareholders’ equity, and disclosures about fair value measurements. ASU 2011-04 also changes the measurement or disclosure requirements related to measuring the fair value of financial instruments that are managed within a portfolio, the application of premiums and discounts in a fair value measurement, and additional disclosure about fair value measurements. The disclosures required under ASU 2011-04 are effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2011. Earlier adoption by public entities is not permitted. The Fresenius Group has applied the guidance under ASU 2011-04 since January 1, 2012, and there has not been a material impact on the results of the Fresenius Group.

gg) Recent pronouncements, not yet applied

The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued the following for the Fresenius Group relevant new standards, which are mandatory for fiscal years commencing on or after January 1, 2013:

In December 2011, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update 2011-11 (ASU 2011-11), FASB ASC Topic 210, Balance Sheet – Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities. This amendment requires disclosing and reconciling the gross and net amounts for financial instruments that are offset in the statement of financial position, and the amounts for financial instruments that are subject to master netting arrangements and other similar clearing and repurchase arrangements. In January 2013, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update 2013-01 (ASU 2013-01), an update to FASB ASC Topic 210, Balance Sheet – Clarifying the Scope of Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities. The main purpose of ASU 2013-01 is to clarify the scope of balance sheet offsetting under ASU 2011-11, FASB ASC Topic 210, Balance Sheet – Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities to include derivatives, repurchase agreements and reverse repurchase agreements, and securities borrowing and securities lending transactions that are offset or subject to master netting agreements. The disclosures required under ASU 2011-11 would apply to these transactions and other types of financial assets or liabilities will no longer be subject to ASU 2011-11. The update and ASU 2011-11 are effective for periods beginning on or after January 1, 2013. The Fresenius Group is currently evaluating the impact of ASU 2011-11 on its consolidated financial statements.

In July 2011, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update 2011-06 (ASU 2011-06), FASB ASC Topic 720, Other Expenses – Fees Paid to the Federal Government by Health Insurers. The amendments in ASU 2011-06 address how health insurers should recognize and classify their income statement fees mandated by the Health Care and Educational Affordability Reconciliation Act. These amendments require that the liability for the fee be estimated and recorded in full once the entity provides qualifying health insurance in the applicable calendar year in which the fee is payable. In conjunction, the corresponding deferred cost is amortized to expense using a straight-line allocation method unless another method better allocates the fee over the entire calendar year for which it is payable. In addition, the ASU states that this fee does not meet the definition of an acquisition cost. The disclosures required under ASU 2011-06 are effective for calendar years beginning after December 31, 2013, when the fee initially becomes effective. The Fresenius Group will apply the guidance under ASU 2011-06 beginning January 1, 2014.

V. Critical accounting policies

In the opinion of the Management of the Fresenius Group, the following accounting policies and topics are critical for the consolidated financial statements in the present economic environment. The influences and judgments as well as the uncertainties which affect them are also important factors to be considered when looking at present and future operating earnings of the Fresenius Group.

a) Recoverability of goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite useful lives

The amount of intangible assets, including goodwill, product rights, tradenames and management contracts, represents a considerable part of the total assets of the Fresenius Group. At December 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, the carrying amount of goodwill and non-amortizable intangible assets with indefinite useful lives was €15,195 million and €12,853 million, respectively. This represented 50% and 49%, respectively, of total assets.

An impairment test of goodwill and non-amortizable intangible assets with indefinite useful lives is performed at least once a year, or if events occur or circumstances change that would indicate the carrying amount might be impaired (Impairment test).

To determine possible impairments of these assets, the fair value of the reporting units is compared to their carrying amount. The fair value of each reporting unit is determined using estimated future cash flows for the unit discounted by a weighted-average cost of capital (WACC) specific to that reporting unit. Estimating the discounted future cash flows involves significant assumptions, especially regarding future reimbursement rates and sales prices, number of treatments, sales volumes and costs. In determining discounted cash flows, the Fresenius Group utilizes for every reporting unit its approved three-year budget, projections for years 4 to 10 and a corresponding growth rate for all remaining years.

These growth rates are 0% to 4% for Fresenius Medical Care, 3% for Fresenius Kabi and 1% for Fresenius Helios and Fresenius Vamed. Projections for up to 10 years are possible due to historical experience and the stability of Fresenius Group’s business, which is largely independent from the economic cycle. The discount factor is determined by the WACC of the respective reporting unit. Fresenius Medical Care’s WACC consisted of a basic rate of 5.79% for 2012. This basic rate is then adjusted by a country-specific risk rate and, if appropriate, by a factor to reflect higher risks associated with the cash flow from recent material acquisitions, until they are appropriately integrated, within each reporting unit. In 2012, WACCs (after tax) for the reporting units of Fresenius Medical Care ranged from 6.35% to 13.51%. In the business segments Fresenius Kabi, Fresenius Helios and Fresenius Vamed, the WACC (after tax) was 5.37%, country-specific adjustments did not occur. If the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, the difference is recorded as an impairment of the fair value of the goodwill at first. An increase of the WACC (after tax) by 0.5% would not have resulted in the recognition of an impairment loss in 2012.

A prolonged downturn in the health care industry with lower than expected increases in reimbursement rates and / or higher than expected costs for providing health care services could adversely affect the estimated future cash flows of certain countries or segments. Future adverse changes in a reporting unit’s economic environment could affect the discount rate. A decrease in the estimated future cash flows and / or a decline in the reporting unit’s economic environment could result in impairment charges to goodwill and other intangible assets with indefinite useful lives which could materially and adversely affect Fresenius Group’s future operating results.

b) Legal contingencies

The Fresenius Group is involved in several legal matters arising from the ordinary course of its business. The outcome of these matters may have a material effect on the financial position, results of operations or cash flows of the Fresenius Group. For details, please see note 30, Commitments and contingent liabilities.

The Fresenius Group regularly analyzes current information about such claims for probable losses and provides accruals for such matters, including estimated expenses for legal services, as appropriate. The Fresenius Group utilizes its internal legal department as well as external resources for these assessments. In making the decision regarding the need for a loss accrual, the Fresenius Group considers the degree of probability of an unfavorable outcome and its ability to make a reasonable estimate of the amount of loss.

The filing of a suit or formal assertion of a claim, or the disclosure of any such suit or assertion, does not necessarily indicate that an accrual of a loss is appropriate.

c) Allowance for doubtful accounts

Trade accounts receivable are a significant asset and the allowance for doubtful accounts is a significant estimate made by the Management. Trade accounts receivable were €3,650 million and €3,234 million in 2012 and 2011, respectively, net of allowance. Approximately 63% of receivables derive from the business segment Fresenius Medical Care and mainly relate to the dialysis care business in North America.

The major debtors or debtor groups of trade accounts receivable were U.S. Medicare and Medicaid health care programs with 14% and private insurers in the United States with 12% at December 31, 2012. Other than that, the Fresenius Group has no significant risk concentration, due to its international and heterogeneous customer structure.

The allowance for doubtful accounts was €406 million and €383 million as of December 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011, respectively.

The allowances are estimates comprised of customer-specific evaluations regarding their payment history, current financial stability, and applicable country-specific risks for overdue receivables. The Fresenius Group believes that these analyses result in a well-founded estimate of allowances for doubtful accounts. From time to time, the Fresenius Group reviews changes in collection experience to ensure the appropriateness of the allowances.

A valuation allowance is calculated if specific circumstances indicate that amounts will not be collectible. When all efforts to collect a receivable, including the use of outside sources where required and allowed, have been exhausted, and after appropriate management review, a receivable deemed to be uncollectible is considered a bad debt and booked out.

Deterioration in the ageing of receivables and collection difficulties could require that the Fresenius Group increases the estimates of allowances for doubtful accounts. Additional expenses for uncollectible receivables could have a significant negative impact on future operating results.

d) Self-insurance programs

Under the insurance programs for professional, product and general liability, auto liability and worker’s compensation claims, the largest subsidiary of Fresenius Medical Care AG & Co. KGaA, located in North America, is partially self-insured for professional liability claims. For further details regarding the accounting policies for self-insurance programs, please see note 1. aa, Self-insurance programs.

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